Posted by: jsuz2000 | May 10, 2018

Bulletin May 2018

PEIPPFA BULLETIN

Executive Committee

Leif Taylor, Searletown – President

Rodney Clow, Bedeque – Vice President

Jeremy Ludyka, Cornwall – Secretary

Stephen Webster, Tarantum – Treasurer

Volume 35 Number 12 May, 2018

MEMBERSHIP

Following is a list of those who had memberships in the association in 2017-18.

Don Bell, Mount Albion, Murray Mitchell, Bonshaw

Rick Bell, Charlottetown, Scott Mitchell, Bonshaw

Clayton Blackett, Morell, Elana Oakes, Elora, Ont.

Jack Blaisdell, Cardigan, Greg Oakes, Elora, Ont.

John Blaisdell, Cardigan, Darren Pettit, Marshfield

James Butler, Montague, Pierre Stebbins, Marshfield

Elizabeth Campbell, York, Gail Steele, Brackley

Rodney Clow, Bedeque, Amanda Swim, Pownal

Brian Court, Charlottetown Emily Swim, Pownal

Mark Dingwell, Leduc, Alta., Lexis Swim, Pownal

Vanessa Gallant, Bedeque, Shelby Swim, Pownal

Joseph Goselin, Wallace Stn., NS, Blaine Taylor, Kensington

Gordon Greene, Charlottetown, Garth Taylor, St. Peter’s Bay

Cathy Griffin, Cornwall, Leif Taylor, Summerside

Wayne Harris, Harvey, NB, Noah Taylor, Summerside

Grancil Hottot, Port Daniel, Que., Drew Trainor, Johnston’s River

Tiffany Jones, Cornwall, Will Trainor, Johnston’s River

Debbie Keefe, Cardigan, Dennis Webster, Cardigan

Dustin Keefe, Cardigan, Steve Webster, Tarantum

Jeremy Ludyka, Cornwall, Jill Wood, Marshfield

Charlotte MacDonald, Charlottetown, Zachary Wood, Marshfield

Herbert MacDonald, Bonshaw, Jane Young, St. Peter’s Bay

Jeff MacDonald, Covehead

Logyn MacDonald, Covehead

Trevor MacDonald, Murray River

Ella MacIntyre, Mount Stewart

Jody MacIntyre, Mount Stewart

Joseph MacIntyre, Mount Stewart

Everett MacLellan, Pleasant Valley

Everett MacNeill, Murray Harbour

Bob Miller, Murray Harbour

Malcolm Mitchell, Bonshaw

 

NOTES OF INTERST

-Dates:

May 12 – Set up for Spring Show (Meeting at Sanderson Farm at 9:00 AM to load materials)

May 19 – 33rd Annual P.E.I. Spring Show (Borden-Carleton)

June 2 – Red Isle Poultry Show (Murray River)

June 3 – Greater Moncton Fur & Feather Club Buy-Sell-Trade Day (Petitcodiac, NB)

June 4 – NEXT MEETING (Southport Animal Hospital, Stratford. 7:00)

July 27 – Northumberland Fisheries Festival Poultry Show (Murray River)

July 28 – Crapaud Exhibition (Crapaud)

August 12-15 – P.E.I. Provincial Exhibition Poultry Show (Charlottetown)

August 24-26 – P.E.I. Plowing Match & Agricultural Fair (Dundas)

Aug. 31-Sept. 1 – Egmont Bay-Mont Carmel Exhibition (Abram’s Village)

September 9 – Eastern Kings Exhibition (Souris)

September 29-30 – New Brunswick Fall Show (Petitcodiac)

October 13 – 2nd Annual Maritime Poultry Meet (Bonshaw)

October 13-14 – Nova Scotia Fall Classic (Middle Musquodoboit)

November 4 – Waterfowl Show (Nappan, N.S.)

November 11 – 89th Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Poultry Show (Toronto)

-CLUB ITEMS FOR SALE: T-shirts – $13.00 and Crests – $4.00. Contact the secretary for items.

-Members are reminded to return all sold Cash Draw tickets to the Spring Show on May 20. The draw will take place that afternoon. Even if you don’t sell any, PLEASE at least buy some for yourself and help support the club. If every member even bought one book, the raffle would turn a profit!

-Your help is greatly appreciated and needed for the Spring Show. Set-up and tear-down require workers. Also, help is needed during the day of the show. See minutes for details.

-A reminder to those who have not yet renewed their memberships that you must renew your membership in order to remain on the active members list. Please send in your membership today.

-There are still some Spring Show awards needing sponsors. Please contact the secretary of interested.

-Note that the date of the Maritime Poultry Meet show in Bonshaw has been changed to October 13.

SEE YOU AT THE SHOW IN BORDEN- CARLETON  MAY 19th

 

LICE AND MITES

(Feather Fancier)

By Fred P. Jeffrey

The control of lice and mites is a never ending problem. Just this spring I talked with a veteran breeder and exhibitor who has had bad infestation of both red mites and northern fowl mites. So you see this is a problem not limited to the beginner or the careless.

The first point to establish is what louse or mite you have and then select the proper control measure. Without knowing the life cycle a lot of time and money can be wasted.

The four most common mites are: (1) Red mite; (2) Northern fowl mite; (3) Feather mite; and (4) Scaly leg mite. The two most common lice are: (1) Body louse; and (2) Head louse.

It cannot be emphasized too much that the agent that kills external parasites of all kinds is SEVIN. Look on the label of whatever you are thinking of buying and if it reads at least 5% SEVIN you cannot go wrong. The author still has some garden dust of the 1970s vintage with 5% SEVIN which is just as good today as it was 20 years ago.

Red Mites: Actually the red mite is small and gray but when gorged with blood it looks red. The red mite spends the day in cracks and crevices near where the bird roosts. At night it migrates to the bodies of the sleeping birds and feeds on their blood. The owner may not realize he has a problem until he sees areas on the body of the bird, including the comb, which are reddened and irritated from the bites of the mites.

CONTROL: Spay all suspected cracks and crevices suspected of harboring the mite. At

the same time, it is helpful to handle each bird individually and apply small pinches of

dust to the irritated areas.

Feather Mites: Feather mites are so small it takes one with good eyesight to see them. Their damage is quite evident – areas in wing primaries or main tail feathers eaten away. In severe cases, the birds are not suitable for showing.

CONTROL: Application of dust to the damaged areas of the feathers. Some prefer to

dip the bird in a soapy solution which carries SEVIN dust.

Northern Fowl Mites: Probably the most harmful mites and lice. The mites are small and black and multiply, particularly in the winter months, at an unbelievable rate. They favor the vent area for laying their eggs (nits) but in extreme infestations they move to other parts of the body. Looking at the vent of a heavily infested bird almost makes one sick – feathers loaded with mites and their nits as well as crusted skin over most of the area. An infested male soon infests all females in the pen by mating with them.

CONTROL: Individual treatment with SEVIN dust. Apply a pinch of dust (with heavy

infestation, a large one) to the infested area. When applying work the dust into all areas

needing it. It is truly remarkable how soon the SEVIN takes effect. In a few days the

crusted skin can be peeled off and most of the feathers loaded with mites and nits can be

cleaned up. It has been the experience of this writer that one good dusting does the job

but to be sure one may wish to repeat the dusting a week or 10 days later.

Body Lice: A fairly large louse with yellowish color preferring to live and reproduce in the vent area as well as under the wings. Infestation can become very heavy, particularly in the summer months.

CONTROL: Individual treatment with SEVIN dust. Apply a pinch as needed.

THIS ARTICLE TO BE CONTINUED IN THE JUNE BULLETIN.

CLOSING COMMENTS

I once again had the pleasure of attending the Mount Forest Buy-Sell-Trade Day in Ontario. I did not come home with much, but it was a lot of fun to get to the event and see many of the fanciers I know. I travelled with Wayne Harris and Brandon Boles; we had a lot of laughs along the way. It is nice to go to a poultry event and have some laughs and visit with some people as well. In case you are wondering, yes, we were at the sale when the gates opened at 5 AM!!

If you are able, please make yourself available to help with the Spring Show. Many hands make light work.

Trevor MacDonald,

Editor

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Posted by: jsuz2000 | April 11, 2018

April 2018 Bulletin

PEIPPFA BULLETIN

Executive Committee

Leif Taylor, Searletown – President

Rodney Clow, Bedeque – Vice President

Jeremy Ludyka, Cornwall – Secretary

Stephen Webster, Tarantum – Treasurer

Volume 35 Number 10 April, 2018

INCUBATION

David Bland

(Feather Fancier)

Much has been written over the years about incubation, but how successful a person is will depend more on his or her attention to detail than the quality of the manufacturer’s machine. When we go back several decades, the old machines, which were simplification itself, nevertheless produced excellent hatches when used by experienced people. Recording was then and should be now, the whole crux of success, for without it we never seem to learn from the several little mistakes we are likely to repeat each season, when working purely and simply from memory. Good records allow us all to improve and experiment. We can try out ideas which others suggest they use very successfully to see if they work in our own environment. I know that each year many end up blaming bad weather or other problems for another poor season’s hatching. This need not be the case, as one can always adjust the incubator to the season. Stock can be another cause, but this is another subject which can be vented on another occasion.

Many if not most chicks are lost through poor humidity, and I am not suggesting that it will be dramatically improved once a humidifier is attached. It is more taking into account the outside temperature, checking the size of the air cell before setting. During the heat of the late spring, the air cell/sac will be smaller in eggs laid at that time than those laid during the late winter or early spring. Such eggs do not usually require water during incubation time, while those laid during the cooler months will require a certain amount.

How much will also depend on the average room temperature. Where it is controlled at say 60 degrees F, the incubator may require about a third of the water tray filled on the 18th day or at least four days before hatching, with different species taking less or longer to hatch. With the incubator room running at a higher temperature even less water is needed.

The area in which the machine is placed is very relative, albeit in an unheated and poorly insulated shed, where it will require a little water at the time of setting. The warmer the air, the more moisture it will carry and vice versa. There are exceptions to this. For example, if you are intending to hatch chicks in the Nevada Desert, where, although extremely hot, it is also a very dry heat, so much so, that incubationists out there literally have bowls of water to set the fertile eggs into, have any chance of hatching.

Going back to what has been said earlier, it is only by keeping accurate records that you can improve your results. If you want to be advised by all and sundry, a system of recording will help you to decide what is best for your incubator in your environment. One can generalize, but such generalization has to be be brought down to specifics, that which affect yours and nobody else’s incubator. Having said that, listen to what the more experienced people tell you, and this may also give you further ideas to improvement.

NOTES OF INTEREST

-Dates:

April 25 – Entries close for Valley Fanciers Spring Show

May 1 – Entries close for P.E.I. Spring Show

May 5 – Valley Fanciers Spring Show (Windsor, NS)

May 7 – NEXT MEETING

May 19 – 33rd Annual P.E.I. Spring Show (Borden-Carleton)

June 2 – Red Isle Poultry Show (Murray River)

June 3 – Greater Moncton Fur & Feather Club Buy-Sell-Trade Day (Petitcodiac, NB)

July 27 – Northumberland Fisheries Festival Poultry Show (Murray River)

July 28 – Crapaud Exhibition (Crapaud)

August 12-15 – P.E.I. Provincial Exhibition Poultry Show (Charlottetown)

August 24-26 – P.E.I. Plowing Match & Agricultural Fair (Dundas)

August 31-September 1 – Egmont Bay-Mont Carmel Exhibition (Abram’s Village)

September 9 – Eastern Kings Exhibition (Souris)

September 29-30 – New Brunswick Fall Show (Petitcodiac)

October 6 – 2nd Annual Maritime Poultry Meet (Bonshaw)

October 13-14 – Nova Scotia Fall Classic (Middle Musquodoboit)

November 11 – 89th Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Poultry Show (Toronto)

-CLUB ITEMS FOR SALE: T-shirts – $13.00 and Crests – $4.00. Contact the secretary for items.

-There are still some Spring Show awards needing sponsors. They are $20 each. If interested in donating funds for awards, please contact the secretary.

-PLEASE TAKE THE TIME TO RENEW YOUR MEMBERSHIP TODAY!

-Remember that the deadline for Spring Show entries is May 1. Please have your entries in on time.

-Sympathies are extended to Garth Taylor on the recent passing of his wife Barb. She was also a member of the association at one time.

-WELCOME BACK to the association is extended to Wilfred McLean, Sydney, NS.

-WELCOME to the association is extended to Andrew Greene, MacLellan’s Mountain, NS.

-Anyone wishing to get an entry form for the Red Isle Show can contact Trevor MacDonald.

BE SURE TO GET YOUR SPRING SHOW ENTRIES IN ON TIME!

 

THE IMPOTANCE OF GREENS

(Feather Fancier)

Green feeds are relished by fowls of all ages. They are low in nutrients but because of their juicy nature, they have a mild laxative effect on birds’ digestive system. They also have the added benefit of containing important vitamins. Green feed is particularly valuable in the feeding of growing chicks and breeding stock. Alfalfa leaf meal is sometimes considered a green feed. Dehydrated alfalfa leaf meal, when available, is a reasonable priced and efficient green feed substitute. Because of its laxative nature, it should not be fed in greater quantity than 5 per cent of the total ration. When the more succulent green feeds are used, the amount given should be limited to five or six pounds daily per 100 layers. When larger amounts are fed, the consumption of other feeds that are richer in nutrients is lessened, hence egg production is reduced. Good alfalfa, clover and grass range are good sources of green feed. When birds must be housed, or for other reason are not on range, such feeds as freshly cut alfalfa, clover or lawn cuttings, sprouted oats, cabbage, kale and turnip should be provided.

PAST REFLECTIONS

The following are the top awards from the 1996 Spring Show. Judges were Bill Shrum of Ontario and Barry McPhee from New Brunswick. There were 813 birds exhibited. There were four exhibitors from Ontario and one from Maine.

Grand Champion – Black Cochin Cock – Bun Hollingsworth, NS

Champion Standard Cock – Black Australorp – Stewart Bleakney, NB

Champion Standard Hen – S.C. White Leghorn – Bun Hollingsworth

Champion Bantam Cock – Black Cochin – Bun Hollingsworth

Champion Bantam Hen – White Plymouth Rock – Don Richardson, Ontario

Champion Gander – Embden – Gerald K. Donnelly, Ontario

Champion Goose – Grey Saddleback – Joe & Jody MacIntyre, PEI

Champion Drake – Grey Call – Reg Hughes, Ontario

Champion Duck – White Indian Runner – James Carson, NB

Champion Tom – Bourbon Red – Roger Docherty, PEI

Champion Hen – Bronze – Roger Docherty

Champion Pigeon Cock – Mealy Show Pen Racer – James Carson

Champion Pigeon Hen – Red Norwich Cropper – Peter Posthuma, NS

Champion Junior Standard – Speckled Sussex Cock – David Ross, PEI

Champion Junior Bantam – Light Brahma Cock – David Ross

Champion Junior Pigeon – A.O.C. Flying Roller Cock – David Ross

CLOSING COMMENTS

This has been an unusual spring so far. Just when we think that the winter has forgotten about us, it pops its ugly head once more. Hopefully there is no more snow.

As you can see from the minutes of the Annual Meeting, there was a good turnout. This is always good to see.

The spring shows will soon be upon us. Windsor is first, followed by our show two weeks after. New this year will be another spring show two weeks after ours. This group is planning a show that will be a fun day for all.

Shows take a lot of work to put on and the Spring Show is no different. We NEED helpers for the show! Please plan to pitch in if you are physically able.

Trevor MacDonald,

Editor

Posted by: jsuz2000 | March 14, 2018

Bulletin March 2018

Executive Committee

Brian Court, Ten Mile House – President

James Butler, Alliston – Vice President

Jeremy Ludyka, Cornwall – Secretary

Stephen Webster, Tarantum – Treasurer

 

Volume 35  Number 9                                                                                            March, 2018

 

WINTER SHOW RESULTS

 

S T A N D A R D S: PLYMOUTH ROCK:  1-BOB-h Willow Creek Poultry.  WYANDOTTE:  1c, 1-BOB-2h Jill Wood.  JERSEY GIANT:  1-BOB-h Trevor MacDonald.  COCHIN:  1c, 1-BOB-h Willow Creek Poultry.  AUSTRALORP:  1-BOB-c, 1h Vance Foreman.  SUSSEX:  1-BOB-2h Willow Creek Poultry.  HAMBURG:  1c, 1-BOB-h T. MacDonald.  AMERAUCANA:  1c, 1-BOB-2h J. Wood.  MODERN GAME:  1c, 1-BOB-h T. MacDonald.  PHOENIX:  1-BOB-c Willow Creek Poultry.  SUMATRA:  1-BOB-h Willow Creek Poultry.  B A N T A M S:  MODERN GAME:  1c, 1-BOB-h V. Foreman.  OLD ENGLISH GAME:  1,2c, 1-BOB-2,3h Robert Miller.  JAPANESE:  1c, 1-BOB-h T. MacDonald.   PLYMOUTH ROCK:  1-BOB-c, 4h T. MacDonald; 2c James Butler; 1,2,3h Leif Taylor.  S.C. RHODE ISLAND RED:  1-BOB-2c, 3,4h Isaac MacEwen; 3c L. Taylor; 4c, 1h Willow Creek Poultry; 2h V. Foreman.  SILVER SPANGLED HAMBURG:  1c, 4h T. MacDonald; 2c R. Miller; 1-BOB-2,3h Noah Taylor.  BLACK WYANDOTTE:  1c, 1,2,4h J. Butler; 2c, 3h Willow Creek Poultry.  PARTRIDGE WYANDOTTE:  1,3c, 2,3h J. Butler; 2,4c, 1-BOB-4h Steve Webster.  A.O.V.  WYANDOTTE:  1c. 1h J. Butler.  MALAY:  1-BOB-c T. MacDonald.  BRAHMA:  1-BOB-2c, 3h J. Butler; 1,2h S. Webster.  COCHIN:  1,2c, 1-BOB-2h Malcolm & Murray Mitchell.  SALMON FAVEOLLE:  1-BOB-2c, 1,2h S. Webster.  D U C K S:  PEKIN:  1m, 1-BOB-f Black Iron Poultry.  BUFF:  1-BOB-m, 1f Black Iron Poultry.  WELSH HARLEQUIN:  1-BOB-m, 1f Black Iron Poultry.  GREY INDIAN RUNNER: 1,2m, 1-BOB-2f N. Taylor.  GREY CALL:  1,4m, 4f Black Iron Poultry; 2,3m, 1-BOB-2,3f N. Taylor.  WHITE CALL:  1,3,4m, 2f Black Iron Poultry; 2m, 1,3,4f L. Taylor.  BLACK EAST INDIE:  1-BOB-m Black Iron Poultry; 2m, 1f L. Taylor.  G E E S E:  EMBDEN:  1-BOB-m Black Iron Poultry.  EGYPTIAN:  1-BOB-m, 1f V. Foreman.  P I G E O N S:  AMERICAN SHOW RACER:  1-BOB-c R. Miller.  CHINESE OWL:  1c, 1-BOB-h R. Miller.   FLYING ROLLER:  1c, 1-BOB-h R. Miller.  ICE PIGEON:  1-BOB-c, 1h Black Iron Poultry.  MODENA:  1,2,3c, 1-BOB-2,3,4h V. Foreman.  POMERANIAN POUTER:  1c, 1-BOB-h R. Miller.  PORTUGUESE TUMBLER:  1-BOB-c, 1h R. Miller.  RACING HOMER:  1-BOB-c, 1h T. MacDonald; 2c, 2h R. Miller.  RUNT:  1-BOB-c, 2h R. Miller; 2c, 1h V. Foreman.  SHOW TIPPLER:  1c, 1-BOB-h R. Miller.  SHOW TYPE HOMER:  1-BOB-c, 1h T. MacDonald.  UTILITY KING:  1-BOB-c Jordan Liantzakis.  WEST OF ENGLAND TUMBLER:  1-BOB-c, 1h T. MacDonald.  DOVE:  1c, 1-BOB-h T. MacDonald.

 

CHAMPIONS

Champion Standard – Black Cochin hen – Willow Creek Poultry

Reserve Standard – Speckled Sussex hen – Willow Creek Poultry

Champion Bantam – Black Cochin hen – Malcolm & Murray Mitchell

Reserve Bantam – Silver Spangled Hamburg hen – N. Taylor

Champion Duck – Grey Call duck – N. Taylor (GRAND CHAMPION)

Reserve Duck – White Call duck – L. Taylor

Champion Goose – Coloured Egyptian gander – V. Foreman

Reserve Goose – Embden gander – Black Iron Poultry

Champion Pigeon – Bronze Tri Schietti Modena hen – V. Foreman

Reserve Pigeon – Blue Check Racing Homer cock – T. MacDonald

Champion Junior Exhibit – Grey Call duck – N. Taylor

 

Judge – Jim Brimicombe (Chickens & Waterfowl) & Jamie Carson (Pigeons)

Number of birds shown – 171

 

 

 

STAGES OF THE MOULT

(Feather Fancier)

 

Editor’s note:  This article was published in the April, 1980, edition of the Feather Fancier. 

 

                      The moulting season reveals the health of the birds, and is nature’s way of changing the feathers and occurs yearly in most birds.

A normal pigeons’ wing contains ten primary and ten secondary feathers.  The moult starts at the front primary, that is the first feather that turns slightly outward, or the tenth feather from the last flight.

The primaries fall strictly in turn.  It occurs simultaneously in an individual feather in both wings.  When it reaches number six or seven, one can expect the tail to start moulting.  The tail feathers do not fall out in the same order as the flights.

There are twelve feathers in a normal tail.  Halving the tail, we have six feathers, one to six, with the outside feather being number one.  The feathers will fall five, six, three, four, one, two.  The two next to the centre two will fall first, and so on.

The secondary feathers also start falling at this time in the moult, and they start at the secondary next to the first primary, and fall towards the body in an opposite manner to the primary feathers.

The body moult starts any time after the fourth primary falls, and is generally over in a month, although most text books state six weeks.  If the moult follows this pattern all is well, but if it doesn’t, look for trouble.

If birds look poorly during the moult examine them – do not be afraid to handle birds during the moult for one can learn so much about one’s birds if they are handled frequently.

One may find that they have stopped in a moult.  If it is possible to detect where it has stopped, that is where the next feather should fall, pull it out.  Also, if they are not moulting evenly, pull out the old odd feathers so that the tail or wing balances.  Never pull more than two at a time as the birds is not fit, and although it will sap strength it will assist the bird to get back in condition.

If a bird fails to start to moult by early August, start them by pulling out number one primary feather in each wing.  This really works.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          NOTES OF INTEREST

-Dates:

March 15 – Deadline for listings for the Maritime Fanciers Directory

April 3– ANNUAL MEETING (Carpenter’s Inc., Kensington. 7:30)

May 5– Valley Fanciers Spring Show (Windsor, NS)

May 19 – 33rd  Annual P.E.I. Spring Show (Borden-Carleton)

June 2 – Red Isle Poultry Show (Murray River)

June 3 – Greater Moncton Fur & Feather Club Buy-Sell-Trade Day (Petitcodiac, NB)

July 27 – Northumberland Fisheries Festival Poultry Show (Murray River)

July 28 – Crapaud Exhibition (Crapaud)

August 12-15 – P.E.I. Provincial Exhibition Poultry Show (Charlottetown)

August 24-26 – P.E.I. Plowing Match & Agricultural Fair (Dundas)

Aug. 31-Sept. 1 – Egmont Bay-Mont Carmel Exhibition (Abram’s Village)

September 9  – Eastern Kings Exhibiton (Souris)

September 29-30 – New Brunswick Fall Show (Petitcodiac)

October 6 – 2nd Annual Maritime Poultry Meet (Bonshaw)

October 13-14 – Nova Scotia Fall Classic (Middle Musquodoboit)

November 11 – 90th Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Poultry Show (Toronto)

 

-CLUB ITEMS FOR SALE:  T-shirts – $13.00 and Crests – $4.00.  Contact the secretary for items.

 

NOTE THAT THE ANNUAL MEETING NEXT MONTH WILL BE HELD ON A TUESDAY INSTEAD OF THE USUAL MONDAY.  THIS IS DUE TO THE MONDAY BEING EASTER MONDAY AND THE CLUB DOES NOT MEET ON A HOLIDAY.

 

-There are still some Spring Show awards needing sponsors.  If you are interested in sponsoring an award, contact the secretary.  They cost $20 each.

 

-Note that it is once again that time of the year to renew your membership.  Please do so soon.

 

-Get Well wishes are extended to Brian Court.

 

-WANTED:  Anyone who has trophies that they would like to get rid of, please contact Trevor MacDonald.  My supply is getting low.  They do not need to be poultry show tropies as new tops can be put on them for poultry shows.  They are used at events such as the Winter Show and some of the summer fairs.

 

-Dustin Keefe and Trevor MacDonald showed at the Atlantic Canada Young Bird Winter Classic (Pigeon) Show in Saint John, N.B., on February 17.  It was a very nice show with about 200 pigeons shown.  Dustin had Best of Breed in Ice Pigeons and American Giant Homers.  He also had Champion Junior Pigeon with the Ice Pigeon.  Trevor had Best of Breed in Show Type Homers, Show Kings, and Fantails.

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP RENEWAL FORM

 

If you are unable to attend the Annual Meeting and wish to renew your membership, simply fill out this form and mail it to the secretary with the proper funds enclosed.

 

Name ____________________________________________________

 

Address __________________________________________________

 

Type of membership:  _____ Senior ($10.00)

 

_____ Junior (No charge)  Under 18

 

Make cheques payable to:  P.E.I. Purebred Poultry (Fanciers) Association

Mail to:  Jeremy Ludyka, 194 Cornwall Rd., Cornwall, P.E.I.  C0A 1H4

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